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Koi Pond Filter Basket Repair

 

Koi pond skimmer filters have a way of getting heavy and causing the filter basket to sag, they don’t bounce back.  You can buy a replacement basket, if you can find one.  Chances are, the new one will also sag the same way once the filter is filled to capacity with pond waste.

Fish FilterBskt 2 Fish Filter Bskt3

There is another fix and you can save a bunch of cash.  When making window screens, save the cut offs from the aluminum used for framing for the screens.  This is one of the many uses you will find for the left over material.

Fish FltrBsktA FshFltrBsktB

As you will notice in the image shown, the aluminum framing makes a great brace to support the back of the basket.

Use the filter (after cleaning) as a template for the size and shape of the back support brace.  Trace it on paper or cardboard.

FishFltrBskt Sup 3 FishFltrBskt Sup 2

At the bottom of drawing, measure and cut the rail to length.  Repeat this step for  top rail.

Using your tape measure, determine the center point of the upper and bottom rail and mark the centers.

Measure the bottom rail.  Take the length of the bottom rail and divide it by 4.  Mark all 4 divisions on the bottom rail.  1 on each end and 1 measured from the right end and 1 measured from the left end of the rail. Place the top rail adjacent to the bottom rail with the center marks near each other.  Mark the 2 inboard marks from the bottom rail onto the top rail.   This is where the interior support bars will be located from the bottom rail to the top rail.

Lay the top and bottom rails in their respective positions on the layout drawing (Place the top rail ¼” from the top of drawing making the vertical bars a ¼” shorter to allow space for final installation).   Measure the distance from top to bottom using the inboard marks as a guide (This will be the length of the 2 inboard support bars.).  Measure the distance from the left end of the bottom rail to the left end of the top rail.  This is the length of the left outside rail.  Repeat this procedure for the right outside rail.  If all the previous steps were done correctly both end rails should be equal.

Assemble all these pieces and you should have a good brace for the back of your filter basket.  It goes on the inside of the basket against the back of the basket, the filter is installed.

You can use short pointed screws, short machine screws with nuts or pop-rivets’ for assembly.

Gonyea Homes Wins Builder of the Year Award

An example of a home built by Gonyea Homes, which was named 2012 Builder of the Year by the Builders Association of the Twin Cities.</p><br />
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An example of a home built by Gonyea Homes, which was named 2012 Builder of the Year by the Builders Association of the Twin Cities.

Gonya Homes & Remodeling is the Twin Cities’ Builder of the Year, according to a local trade association.

The Golden Valley builder won the honor from the Builders Association of the Twin Ciites for its “outstanding business practices and high levels of integrity,” according to a news release.
The award is selected through a blind survey of BATC members that evaluate builders on a variety of criteria, including trust, communication loyalty and ethics. The company with the highest score wins.
Gonya’s sales have rebounded along with the new housing market. The company’s sales of new homes are up more than 400 percent since 2009. The company, which was founded in 1987, anticipates substantial growth in 2013 as well, according to a statement from managing principal Tony Sonnen.
“We’ve already sold twice as many homes this year than in 2011, and we’re anticipating more in 2013,” he said in a news release.
Gonya and the rest of the industry are enjoying some success this year as new home construction picks up after the recession. Statistics released last week by the BATC show that new home permits issued in October were up 96 percent compared to the same month a year ago.

Minneapolis / St. Paul Business Journal by Sam Black, Senior reporter
Date: Monday, October 29, 2012, 11:51am CDT

Spray On Texture

Can knock down drywall patch.

This was the lead in to a great report that I came across today in the Las Vegas Review Journal

BY MIKE KLIMEK
ASK THE HANDYMAN

Posted: Oct. 11, 2012 | 2:04 a.m.

Q: I had a small hole in my drywall, which I patched. My problem is that I just can’t seem to closely match the texture of the surrounding drywall, and consequently my patch stands out. What can I do to make it blend in?

 

 

http://www.lvrj.com/home_and_garden/spray-on-texture-can-knock-down-drywall-patch-173663521.html

I Must Apologize

Not stressing the importance of the money saving tips or the huge savings of time and energy for you is really teaching me how to apologizeI’m sorry that I haven’t found a way to reach out to you by explaining the savings that you will recognize on your power bill just on this simple tip on air conditioning.  This neglect has possibly affected your lifestyle in the fact that you could have used this extra money for necessities or just for a fling around town.

To capture the advantages of these ‘Money saving Tips’ you can click here now and they will magically pop up so that you may be apprised of the many ideas available to you.

This message has been brought to you by your friendly neighborhood remodeling teacher http://learnremodeling.com/spring-cleaning-tips/ .

Woman Files Lawsuit, Contractor Fails to Remodel House

GALVESTON – Catherine Gardiner has filed a lawsuit.  Complaining a local contractor took her money.  Then failed to work on her Brenham home.

Her charges are.  Friendswood resident Phil Messarra, doing business as Master Craftsmen, “engaged in false, misleading or deceptive acts or practices.” Court papers filed Aug. 9 in Galveston County Court at Law No. 2 say.

Gardiner hired the defendant to undertake a remodeling job.  His representations were “that he had the skill, knowledge, experience, expertise, financial wherewithal, staff and personnel” for the subject project.

The suit, however, claims.  The remodeling contractor allowed said project to drag on “for over seven months.  This is well past the promised time of completion.”

It adds that he spent funds and time allotted to the plaintiff’s order on other work.

The plaintiff states she wrote him a demand letter dated June 3.  But the “issues and deficiencies raised in that correspondence remained after six weeks following the letter.  They still remain to this day.”

“The defendant has had more than enough time to address and remedy these serious matters,” the original petition says.

“Unfortunately, the defendant has wholly failed to do so.”

“Numerous” breaches prompted Gardiner to terminate Messarra.

She insists the defendant’s supposed actions led to the loss of property value.

A jury trial is requested.

Attorney Douglas A. McAninch with Douglas A. McAninch P.C. in Friendswood is representing the plaintiff, and Galveston County Court at Law No. 2 Judge Barbara Roberts is presiding over the case.

Cause No. 68,040

Until next time, Happy Home Improving!

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Great tips huh?  How do you feel about these tips?  If you want additional information, just ask.  Either send me an email to support@LearnRemodeling.com or ask a question in the comment area.  You will receive a response very soon.

Remember to receive all updates, just register on one of the easy forms in the sidebar.  Be sure to share with your friends.

If you have remodeling planed in the future and you plan to hire a contractor, I suggest that you have a look at this report.  The Investment is 100% Money-Back Guaranteed for 60 days by clickbank. 

Ultimate Guide To The Home Remodeling Process Click Here

 

 

7 Questions Homeowners Should Ask

Author and Remodeling Expert Dan Fritschen shares 7 Questions Homeowners Should Ask Before Starting Construction

Edited by published Wed, 22 Aug 2012 – 08:32:43 -0700 PDT

Dan FritschenSUNNYVALE, Calif. /California Newswire/ — “Remodeling isn’t for everyone, and many times it could be a downright bad decision,” says author and expert Dan Fritschen, founder of www.remodelormove.com. “It’s well worth your time to pause and consider what your proposed project entails, and whether the it’s worth the time, energy, and money you’ll end up pouring into it.”

The “Should I Remodel?” Online Calculator can help you make that determination. It asks 15 questions and provides a recommendation based on the homeowner’s goals.

The calculator can be found at www.remodelormove.com/should-you-remodel and takes only a minute to complete – and is free to use.

Here, Fritschen shares seven of the calculators questions that can help decide if you remodeling is the right choice.

Which are we more excited about: Hawaii or hardwood floors? It may sound elementary, but leaning toward ‘vacation’ over ‘remodel’ is a good barometer for determining how important an updated home actually is to you.

“Unless a specific renovation really is your heart’s desire, you’d probably be better off traveling than pouring money into an already-functional room,” comments Fritschen.

Are we the Joneses? If you are the Joneses with whom everyone wants to keep up, it’s likely that the addition or remodel you’re planning will end up being a lot of work that won’t increase the value of your home.

“If you want a bigger or nicer home and you already have the biggest and nicest in the neighborhood, it may make more sense to move to a new home that has all the features you want in a neighborhood full of larger and nicer residences,” says Fritschen.

Can we really afford this? There are smart, financially savvy ways to remodel, including using money from savings, using a 203k mortgage, or refinancing and getting cash back on your home. However, if the only ways you can pay for your remodel are to tap into retirement accounts or use your credit cards, then the cost of remodeling increases significantly and is then much harder to justify.

“If you can’t pay for a remodel the ‘smart’ way, then it is better to wait a few years and focus on saving up the money you’ll need,” advises Fritschen.

How long will we be in this house? If there’s a chance you may be moving soon, Fritschen says there is a very good reason not to remodel. Remodeling is a lot of work and if you move soon after finishing you won’t have an opportunity to enjoy the results.

Is this a good investment? Do your research before making any commitments so that you’ll have a fairly accurate idea of what to expect in terms of the cost to remodel and your home’s updated value.

“If the numbers aren’t promising and the thought of not making a clear profit when you eventually sell your home horrifies you, you might want to rethink your renovations,” he urges.

“Remember, the project should improve not only your home, but also your happiness and quality of life-without breaking the bank or driving your family around the bend,” Fritschen concludes. “And again, be sure to take advantage of the free Should I Remodel?

Answers to YOUR remodeling questions!

Remodel or Move(TM) is an independent organization whose mission is to empower consumers to make the best remodel and move decision. To achieve this mission, Remodel or Move provides reference materials, evaluation tools, and no-nonsense advice to all consumers. Remodel or Move promotes no agenda other than the interests of consumers.

The organization’s reference materials and educational components include: * The website: www.remodelormove.com/ . * The Remodel or Move Calculator: an online analysis tool that provides homeowners with a specific recommendation: to remodel or move; * Private consultations; * Group seminars; * The book: “Remodel or Move? Make the Right Decision” (ISBN: 978-1933007694; ABCD Publishing LLC), in bookstores nationwide.

About Dan Fritschen:

Dan Fritschen is the creator of Remodel or Move (remodelormove.com), a homeowner support organization that helps homeowners become better informed so that they can make the right decision on whether to remodel or move.

He started his company after twenty years of remodeling his own homes and helping others make “remodel or move” decisions for themselves. Because he is neither a realtor nor a remodeler, he is qualified to offer pragmatic, unbiased advice.

Fritschen’s goal is to make homeowners aware of three important messages: 1. Selling your house COSTS money. 2. There are MANY right ways to remodel, some expensive and some cheap. 3. It is better to move than to over-improve or do an “ugly” remodel.

About the Book:

“Remodel or Move? Make the Right Decision” (ABCD Publishing LLC, 2005, ISBN: 978-1933007694, $15.95) is available at bookstores nationwide and major online booksellers.

Copyright © 2012 CaliforniaNewswire® and Neotrope®. California Newswire is a publication of the Neotrope News Network and a U.S. reg. TM of Neotrope.

ABOUT THE EDITOR: Valerie Gotten (aka Valerie G) is an abstract painter, former movie stand-in, and volunteers for “green events” to help raise awareness about global warming, and help preserve California’s wilderness and natural beauty.   

Until next time, Happy Home Improving!

You will also find free tips by clicking on Tips in the page header or ‘Click Here.’

Great tips huh?  How do you feel about these tips?  If you want additional information, just ask.  Either send me an email to support@LearnRemodeling.com or ask a question in the comment area.  You will receive a response very soon.

Remember to receive all updates, just register on one of the easy forms in the sidebar.  Be sure to share with your friends.

If you have remodeling planed in the future and you plan to hire a contractor, I suggest that you have a look at this report.  The Investment is 100% Money-Back Guaranteed for 60 days by clickbank.

Ultimate Guide To The Home Remodeling Process Click Here

 

Why the Home Depot Stores Are the Biggest

If I remember correctly, Big Red or affectionately known as Home Depot  has been in the construction remodeling business for between 25 and 30 years along with being the biggest home improvements and improvement remodeling retailer for a while longer.  At that time we were asking how do I get to home depot?

At first they would sell cabinets to a customer and then hire the completion, the small contractor to do the installation labor.  Were they, Home Depot, licensed to hang cabinets or do plumbing or electrical?  No, they got around this requirement by making it the subcontractors responsibility to acquire all the permits, insurance and licenses if any were needed.

I remember doing a couple of the subcontractor jobs for them.   At that time they only charged for hanging the cabinets and the cabinet trim in the kitchen.  There was plenty of profitable work left over for the talented contractor, such as drywall repair, electrical wiring, sink hook up, tile work and the list could last a while and if the customer was happy with the work, one could expect to return for the bathroom remodels that would be coming next.

This gets me into what Home Depot is currently starting to do.  I just finished reading an article about their having bought a website called Redbeacon.com.  I checked out the site, currently it is a rather basic site, they get you plumbers, painters and more, quality quotes, a home service warrantee, but knowing the powers that be with the Home Depot that is probably on purpose, an effort not to offend their potential customers.  I was reading in the press release that 3% of their customers, which are the professionals, are responsible for 35% of their business.  Wow!  Check out the site http://Redbeacon.com.

I am a little excited about what they are about to accomplish with this Redbeacon.com idea.  There is no way that it will not work.  I feel this could be instrumental in helping to prevent some of the less than up and up so called fly-by-nighters that are just having the business fall into their laps.

As a result of being associated with the construction industry for the last 45 years.  It is not possible for one not to hear about a customer from time to time that has been ripped off by a so called fly-by-night contractor.  They, the contractor, would take a sizeable down payment, remove the roof down to the ceiling joist, in the middle of winter while it was raining or snowing, then claim bankruptcy or just plain disappear, seemingly just to rip them off.  At the time while working in the Chicago land area these rumors were like an epidemic, it seemed to happen one after another.  Contraire, contraire, this goes to show, don’t give anybody too much money up front and be careful to look ahead for what can happen.  This is known as CYA cover your assets.

 To read this very interesting article ‘Click Here”

Until next time, Happy Home Improving!

You will also find free tips by clicking on Tips in the page header or ‘Click Here.’

Great tips huh?  How do you feel about these tips?  If you want additional information, just ask.  Either send me an email to support@LearnRemodeling.com or ask a question in the comment area.  You will receive a response very soon.

Remember to receive all updates, just register on one of the easy forms in the sidebar.  Be sure to share with your friends.

If you have remodeling planed in the future and you plan to hire a contractor, I suggest that you have a look at this report.  The Investment is 100% Money-Back Guaranteed for 60 days by clickbank.

Ultimate Guide To The Home Remodeling Process Click Here

 

 

Preparation Most Important Part of Painting

A great article in the Las Vegas Review Journal From Yesterday

By MIKE KLIMEK
ASK THE HANDYMAN

Posted: Aug. 16, 2012 | 2:05 a.m.

Q: I got an estimate to have a room painted and I think the cost is way too high for my budget. How much would it cost if I were to do it myself, and how hard is it?

A: Painting is a job that is inexpensive on materials, but intensive on labor. In other words, you get to put in the elbow grease. It’s not difficult work, but you can’t be careless about it, either.

Depending on the quality of paint that you use, you can paint an average-sized bedroom for about $100. Plan on spending a day or so on the project. As is usually the case, painting the room is fast and easy; it’s the preparation that is the most important and time consuming.

If you can, remove everything from the room. If something is too large, put it in the middle of the room and cover it with a plastic tarp. Next, protect the carpet by running 3-inch masking tape along the baseboard. Push the tape under the base with either a wallpaper smoothing tool or a dull putty knife so as not to cut the tape.

Cover the carpet with either fabric or plastic drop cloths (fabric is better because it won’t move or become slippery). If you choose plastic, tape it down with the masking tape.

Remove all switch plate covers, air register grates and window coverings. Also, tape over outlets and switches as well as doorknobs, doorstops, hinges and strike plates. Remove light fixture covers, and cover the light bases with plastic bags and tape.

If you find old water stains on the ceiling, seal them with a stain sealer.

Sand the woodwork (if you have any) with a medium-grit sanding sponge. This will roughen the hard surface, as well as remove any high-gloss finish.

Next, consider cleaning hand-oil deposits from areas around light switches and door moldings with a deglosser/cleaner. This will help the new paint properly adhere.

Prime the woodwork with a solvent-based primer. Use a small brush for the doorjambs, casings and baseboards, and a ½-inch nap roller for the door.

Fill in nail holes and gouges in walls and lightly sand the walls with medium-grit sandpaper to knock off any bumps or imperfections from the previous paint job.

When you buy paint, stick with a higher grade from a recognized manufacturer. A gallon of quality paint will typically cover about 400 square feet. Estimate the amount of square feet you are covering (don’t forget the ceilings and closets) and divide by 400. Always round up so that you have extra paint, and realize that this number assumes only one coat of paint. If you are changing colors, particularly from a darker color to a lighter one, you will probably need multiple coats.

Next, roll on the ceiling paint. If you have popcorn ceiling texture, use a ¾-inch nap roller (if you have typical knock-down texture you can use a ½-inch nap). Roll on the first coat lightly in one direction, and then roll the second coat perpendicular to the first coat. You want to avoid having any popcorn texture fall from the ceiling and a light touch helps. Actually, popcorn texture should be sprayed with an airless sprayer to avoid texture on the floor.

Caulk all wall and woodwork joints with paintable caulking and smooth it out with a wet finger.

Cut in with a 3-inch brush and roll one wall at a time (“cutting in” refers to transitioning from one wall to another, particularly if the walls are different colors). This way, the wet cut-in will blend with the rolled area and will not leave a noticeable mark where the hand-painted area meets the rolled area. Use a ½-inch nap roller for the walls, first from top to bottom, then from side to side.

If you need to take a break, leave the roller in the tray and wrap the tray with plastic wrap. If you want to quit for the day, put the brush in a plastic bag and place it in the freezer – just thaw it out 30 minutes before use. I would replace the roller and the tray liner with new ones for the next day.

Until next time, Happy Home Improving!

You will also find free tips by clicking on Tips in the page header or ‘Click Here.’

Great tips huh?  How do you feel about these tips?  If you want additional information, just ask.  Either send me an email to support@LearnRemodeling.com or ask a question in the comment area.  You will receive a response very soon.

Remember to receive all updates, just register on one of the easy forms in the sidebar.  Be sure to share with your friends.

If you have remodeling planed in the future and you plan to hire a contractor, I suggest that you have a look at this report.  The Investment is 100% Money-Back Guaranteed for 60 days by clickbank.

Ultimate Guide To The Home Remodeling Process Click Here

 

 

In good design, size and scale matter the most

From time to time I find a great article in the Las Vegas Review Journal

Today is LVRJ under interior design there was a quote: “Always design a   thing by considering it in its new larger context – a chair to fit in a room, a room in a house, a house in an environment, an environment in a city plan. “ Eliel Saarinen (1873-1950), Finnish architect, Time Magazine

 

Size does matter!

Size and scale are important in almost everything in our lives—clothing, cars, houses and design to name a few.  As a matter of fact, they are two of the more important aspects of good design, or the keys to simply living easier in your favorite place.  They create cohesion in your furnishings and provide great style in your home.

And if within a few exceptions, every piece of furniture or art, each accessory, window treatment and every room layout is tied to scale and size.  Read more:

Until next time, Happy Home Improving!

You will also find free tips by clicking on Tips in the page header or ‘Click Here.’

 

Great tips huh?  How do you feel about these tips?  If you want additional information, just ask.  Either send me an email to support@LearnRemodeling.com or ask a question in the comment area.  You will receive a response very soon.

 

Remember to receive all updates, just register on one of the easy forms in the sidebar.  Be sure to share with your friends.

 

If you have remodeling planed in the future and you plan to hire a contractor, I suggest that you have a look at this report.  The Investment is 100% Money-Back Guaranteed for 60 days by clickbank.

 

Ultimate Guide To The Home Remodeling Process Click Here

 

 

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